As Good As It Gets by Fiona Gibson

As Good As It Gets

The blurb: Charlotte Bristow is worried about her husband Will. With her 16-year-old daughter Rosie newly signed to a top modeling agency, and Will recently out of a job, things are changing in their household.

As Will dusts down his old leather trousers and starts partying with their new, fun neighbours, Charlotte begins to wonder what on earth is going on.

So when Fraser, Charlotte’s ex – and father of Rosie – suddenly arrives back on the scene, she starts to imagine what might have been… A warm, funny read for fans of Outnumbered and the novels of Fern Britton, Fiona writes about life as it really is.

“Midlife crisis? WHAT midlife crisis?!”

When Fiona Gibson wrote this book, she had to have known the clichés that would ensue, namely, ‘This book is as good as it gets.’ Maybe she just hoped that it would be used this way instead of ‘Is this as good as it gets?’ Either way, the former is true. This book is as close to chick lit perfection as one can get. It harps back to the age of chick-lit where there wasn’t so much of an emphasis on the shock factor- where you could just enjoy comedy and drama and get carried along with everyday occurances.

Our story begins with an exchange between a young girl who is pregnant and the mother of the guy she fell pregnant to (let’s just put it like that for the moment, we can put it many other ways, but for all intensive purposes, we’ll go with this!). The girl is wondering where the guy has, ok, em, fecked off to, and his mother is quick to reply with a pay off and a ‘have a good life’ type spiel.

Fast forward sixteen years and the girl, Charlotte, is now grown up and starting to feel like she’s fighting a losing battle. Her daughter’s descent into the (only slightly) murky waters of modeling and husband’s decision to relive the glory days of his youth, coupled with the arrival of an new family on the block, are dealt with brilliantly. There is no ‘poor me,’ no extra hammering home of what a great person Charlotte is; she just gets on with things and comedy ensues. All of the characters are human, and real, you muddle along with Charlotte, rolling your eyes at Rosie and Will, raising your eyebrows at Fraser’s appearance, then heading off to the ‘posh crisp factory’ where Charlotte works.

See, I’m assuming you want me to go into more detail here but there really is nothing more to say. Nothing to find fault with in this book. Not a book that you fly through in a day, more one that you savour for when you can sit down and properly enjoy it. Loved it. Will be searching out Ms. Gibson’s back catalogue without a doubt.

5/5

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