Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

ThegirlonthetrainWhat they say:

THE NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER.
YOU DON’T KNOW HER. BUT SHE KNOWS YOU.
Rear Window meets Gone Girl, in this exceptional and startling psychological thriller

‘Gripping, enthralling – a top-notch thriller and a compulsive read’
S J WATSON, bestselling author of Before I Go To Sleep

Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same signal each time, overlooking a row of back gardens. She’s even started to feel like she knows the people who live in one of the houses. ‘Jess and Jason’, she calls them. Their life – as she sees it – is perfect. If only Rachel could be that happy.

And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough.

Now everything’s changed. Now Rachel has a chance to become a part of the lives she’s only watched from afar.

Now they’ll see; she’s much more than just the girl on the train…

 

The Review: Chances are, you’ve heard of this. Neatly coupled with ‘Gone Girl’ by Gillian Flynn for every mention, it’s the book that everybody wants to know if you’ve read. So I read it. I had read ‘Gone Girl’ some time ago and I was firmly in the ‘loved it’ camp (yes, you have to take sides, apparently it’s not possible to just like it, it’s a black and white love or hate game).

As you can see above, it’s the story of Rachel, who is taking the train every morning. Up until now, Rachel had been stumbling through life, reeling from the break up of her marriage, and was dealing with alcohol issues. We start to get some of her back story, while seeing her struggling to keep it together. I loved her reasoning and justifications, and I felt for her, although there were times when you did wish she could get it together (I felt a bit guilty for thinking this.) Anyhoo, in first person, we experience Rachel imagining the stories of a couple she sees from afar when the train stops at a signal. She is obsessed with them, thinking of them as the perfect couple, no flaws, no secrets. One morning, she thinks she sees something, and this, coupled with a news story, brings her life new meaning. The alcohol was a great tool in the story as you weren’t quite sure what Rachel was remembering or whether she was credible at all, but then, there weren’t a lot of credible people in this story!

The story is given to us mostly from her point of view, and then we get the point of view of other people who are involved with what happens. I did wish we could have had one or two more points of view to even it out a little.

A psychological thriller, ‘The Girl on the Train’ is actually a light enough read, I didn’t get fully absorbed into it as I did ‘The Girl with no Past‘ (they coupled it with these two books so I’m going to go there too!) but I did enjoy it. I think, had this been the first thriller I’d read, I’d possibly have enjoyed it more, but ‘Gone Girl’ was in the back of my head and I was constantly making comparisons and clumping them together. Conversely, if I read ‘Gone Girl’ now I don’t know if I’d think it was so innovative or enjoyable. I’d say read it and enjoy. Either way, you’re probably going to read it anyway, aren’t you? I would say it’s more for those of us who don’t read a lot of thrillers, and who are on the lookout for something not too violent or gruesome.

Rathing: 4/5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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6 thoughts on “Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

  1. I didn’t think so either, Michelle, I used to live off detective books when I was younger, had a dalliance with Dean Koontz and Stephen King but then grabbed hold of chick lit and didn’t let go, loved it too much! Lately I find myself looking to ‘read outside the box;)’ This was much lighter than ‘The Girl with no Past,’ but ‘Gone Girl’ was really a standout for me, really enjoyed it. There’s another ‘I let you go’ by Clare Macintosh that I HAVE to look into, I’ve heard so many raves about it!

    Liked by 1 person

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