Turning down the lights, just a little – The Girl With No Past by Kathryn Croft

thegirlwithnopast

 

What they say:

Twenty years running from your past. Today it catches up.

A gripping psychological thriller for fans of Gone Girl and The Girl on the Train.

Leah Mills lives a life of a fugitive – kept on the run by one terrible day from her past. It is a lonely life, without a social life or friends until – longing for a connection – she meets Julian. For the first time she dares to believe she can live a normal life.

Then, on the twentieth anniversary of that day, she receives a card. Someone knows the truth about what happened. Someone who won’t stop until they’ve destroyed the life Leah has created.

But is Leah all she seems? Or does she deserve everything she gets?

Everyone has secrets. But some are deadly.

 

The review: To start let me just remind you that I predominantly read romantic comedies and so if you are looking for an assessment from someone who has experience with this genre you might want to look elsewhere! That being said, everyone wants to diversify what they read, and if, like me, you want to delve into the odd thriller without going too hardcore then this is one for you! Note: I will be reading ‘Girl on a Train’ soon but I loved Gone Girl (book only, not the film) so that might give you an indication whether this suits.

I had heard many great things about this book and I was not disappointed. We meet Leah Mills as she goes about her daily routine, a routine that is the same daily, that NEEDS to have absolutely no variation. Leah works in a library, which obviously sealed the deal for me straight off, it being my dream job, but tries her best not to get close to those around her. I was very quickly walking in Leah’s shoes,and in a similar way to ‘The Year I Met You’ by Cecilia Ahern (similar in the way I empathised with the lead), daily life, the brightness of it, became that little bit more of an irritation, as I hankered to get back to see what was happening and experience the darkness that surrounded Leah. We were not told what the anniversary that Leah’s existance led to was of, this being one of the many twists that were in the book. There were a few twists that kept the pacing flowing, but none of them, in my opinion, unnecessary. The big secret, what Leah felt herself to be so guilty of that she didn’t deserve to be recognised as a human being, was justifiable, so not one of those books where a build up led to nothing. I found it quite shocking, but again I’m not sure if it’s just the difference in genre. The characters served their purpose and the story was told through flashbacks that were well spaced out and very well done. The way the book dealt with the effect of events on family and friends was exemplery and by the end, my mind was well and truly taken over. I experienced my first book hangover as a result and it took a few days to find my next read. Loved it. Highly recommended.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s